The Art of Bookbinding: Learn More at Artoberfest. Featured Artist Todd Davis Western Avenue Studio: A314

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Our previous featured artist is not the only Western Avenue Studios Artist Association (WASAA) member gearing up to go back to school.  Book binder, Todd Davis, doubles as a receptionist at the North Bennet Street School, his alma mater.

Hands-on and Technically Challenging – A lover of history and old crusty books, Todd became interested in how books work during the many hours he spent among the stacks while pursuing his undergraduate degree in history at the University of Massachusetts Boston.  A former software consultant of 30 plus years, he likes that book binding is a technically challenging, hands-on process that doesn’t require a keyboard or computer.

Nomadic – Todd was born in Texas, raised in Ohio, and lived in Florida before moving to New England to work for Wang Laboratories in 1982.  After living in Nashua, NH, he moved to Medford, MA, then finally settled in the South End of Boston.  Each time he comes to work at Western Avenue Studios, he commutes an hour and a half by commuter rail.

Right Place at the Right Time – Establishing a bindery can be very costly and time consuming.  However, fate was hard at work the day Todd came across a mailing list announcement about a binder in Norwich, VT who was looking to sell his entire bindery before he retired.  It was an all or nothing acquisition.  So, Todd plunged head first into his new mid-life career.  After a good deal of searching, he decided to set up shop here at Western Avenue a little over two years ago.  Getting the equipment into his studio was a great feat, as some of his equipment fully assembled weighs 1000 lbs or more.

Restoration & Repairs – Besides commissions and workshops, Todd provides book repair services.  Each repair project presents various obstacles, but Todd loves the challenge as well as the mystery and history involved in taking a book a part.  He usually has an old time radio show playing in the background when he’s dissecting book structures, except in July when he faithfully watches the Tour de France.  Some of his past repair projects include: a family bible, a Roman Missal, a 50-year-old wedding photo album, and a private library’s circulating collection.

Visiting Western Avenue Studios During Artoberfest – Like several other Western Avenue artists, Todd will be conducting demonstrations on his latest projects during Artoberfest (10/6, 10/7). In addition, you can find Todd in his studio sometime between 9am-6pm on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays during a typical week.  Walk-ins are always welcome.

For more information on the Middlesex Bindery, check out Todd’s website: https://middlesexbindery.com/ and his Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/MiddlesexBindery.

Check out our Artoberfest Facebook Event Page for further details!

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Back to School Featured Artist: Susan Drennan. Western Avenue Studio: 221

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Resilient, Determined, Competitive, and Disciplined – Western Avenue Studios Artist Association (WASAA) member Susan Drennan is diligently getting ready to go back to school on August 29th.  A non-traditional student, Susan is a retired mother of four from Danvers who is currently a junior (majoring in painting and minoring in curatorial studies) at Montserrat College of Art in Beverly, MA.  This semester, she will be enrolled in a painting class, an art history course on Greek and Roman Art, and an independent study.

A Love of Painting – Susan started painting when she was 20 years old and enjoys the “different state of mind” she reaches when she’s focused on painting.  She usually has multiple projects going at once and she likes to work in the following four mediums: oil, acrylic, pastel, and watercolor.  A lover of the outdoors, she often engages in plein air painting and when the weather doesn’t cooperate, she retreats to her quiet studio.  Because she believes in using her God-given talent, Susan paints every day.  As a goal-oriented person who likes a challenge, she hopes to get into a plein air art festival as well as teach painting classes one day.  Lately, she’s been working on loosening up her style by engaging in timed painting exercises.  This lover of cartoons, color, and coffee provided the following advice for young artists: “Practice drawing (perspective, value, composition) as much as you can.  Paint what you want, and don’t be afraid to fail because every time you paint you learn.”

Varied Work and Life Experiences – Susan has been a homeschooler, a technical illustrator, a cake shop owner, a clown, a metal chipper and grinder, a New England School of Art & Design (NESAD) student, a kitchen worker at Gordon College, a personal trainer, a competitive body builder, and a portrait artist.  She moved into Western Avenue Studios approximately 18 months ago.  Her first studio was located on the fourth floor, but she recently moved down to the second floor C/D mill.  An advocate for repurposing and reusing, Susan often checks out Western Avenue’s Free Cycle area for materials she can put to good use.  For example, the beautiful wood portion of her studio floor came from Free Cycle as did her work space cabinet and table top.

Visiting Western Avenue Studios and Lofts – If you come by to visit Susan, a comfy chair awaits you on the far side of her studio, and provides a great view of her salon-style gallery.  Her fine art is also visible on her website: susandrennanart.com and her Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/susandrennan.finearts/.  In addition, Susan plans to have a 20% sale in her studio during Artoberfest (10/6, 10/7) and Holiday Open Studios (12/1, 12/2, 12/8, 12/9).

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Featured Artist – Bruce Wood – Studio 427

You’ve seen Bruce Wood’s creations all over Western Ave & even outside our walls, now find out what makes him tick!


Q:  Tell us a little bit about your background. Where are you from? Where did you study? How long have you been an artist?

A: I grew up in Massachusetts. After graduating High School I attended Arizona Western College on an athletic scholarship. Then transferred to Northern Arizona University to study art. I have received a Bachelor of Science with an extended major in ceramics. I transitioned directly in to graduate school and received a Master of Arts in art education. Creativity has always been in my life. I have expressed it through building furniture, making pottery, fabricating jewelry, designing digital imagery, photography, and now through found object sculpture.

Q: What is the first thing you remember making/creating by hand?

A: As a kid I remember building tree houses and forts. I once found an out-cropping of raw clay and turned it into pottery.

Q: What do you love most about your art?

A: I love the challenge of putting things together that don’t belong together and making them look like they go together naturally. I also enjoy using everyday objects in a design and hiding them in plain view.

Q:  What is your biggest obstacle with your art?

A: Time. I have a multitude of ideas that I want to attempt, and not enough time to tackle them all.

Q:  Describe a typical art creativity session. What is it like? For example, do you work in silence, or do you work to music? Do you prefer to be alone, or do you need people around?

A: I work on several ideas at once. Each project spins off ideas for something new. I am torn between finishing an existing project or starting a new one. I jump from one thing to another and am always challenged to make my next piece better than the last.
When I am in the zone all existence is blocked out except the tasks at hand.

Q:  How does your personality translate into your art?

A: I like to make things that please me. I like to continually improve my skills and talents. The thought of failure rarely enters into the equations.
I am comfortable spending time by myself, living inside my head.

Q:  Did you always know you wanted to make the art you make today? Did you start out in a different medium in the early days?

A: I never imagined making the art I do today. I always believed I would be a potter. I like trying new things which has lead me to new art, media and skills.

Q:  What advice do you have for someone just starting out as an artist?

A: Make a lot of art and always try to improve. Don’t worry about the opinions of others. We are all in a growth process with our art.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the arts community?

A: I love being around a community of artists. For a long time I made art by myself. I learned that using myself as my own inspiration eventually stifled my artwork. My art has grown exponentially since I have moved into Western Avenue Studios.

You can visit Bruce in his Studio #427 on the First Saturday of each month at Western Avenue Open Studios!

 

Featured Artist – Laurie Simko – Studio A512

Our newest Featured Artist is oil painter Laurie Simko! Here’s her story!

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Q: Tell us a little bit about your background. Where are you from? Where did you study? How long have you been an artist?

A:  I grew up in Needham, MA and went to California Institute of the Arts to get a BFA degree. I’ve drawn and painted throughout my life though not much when I was working full-time as a graphic designer, and as a mother of 2. My children are now self-sufficient and have tapered off my graphic design work. I devote most of my time to art-making which has been a life-long dream.

Q:  What do you love most about your art?

A: Art-making for me has elements of joy and struggle, satisfaction and frustration, confidence and doubt, which I think reflects the macrocosm of life. It’s a worthy and engaging struggle though and very much a part of my life. The best part of art-making for me is the mental challenge and contentment I feel producing my work.

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Q: What is your biggest obstacle with your art?

A: One aspect I find difficult is the marketing and promotion of my work. It’s hard to both create and market one’s art. I’m not that good at it but am trying to “get out there” more in social media, galleries, etc.

Q: Describe a typical art creativity session. What is it like? For example, do you work in silence, or do you work to music? Do you prefer to be alone, or do you need people around?

A:  I almost always have music to listen to when I work. I love all kinds of music – it both sets the mood and inspires me. After working alone for many hours it’s nice to have a break and chat with neighbors. Then you can go back to look at your work and say, Wow, what a mess, or Hmm, looks okay.

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Q:  Did you always know you wanted to make the art you make today? Did you start out in a different medium in the early days?

A: One painting leads to and informs the next, so it’s an ever-evolving process that unfolds organically. I couldn’t predict where I am now and have no idea where I’ll be in 5 years with my painting. I try to stay positive – hopefully growing and in a very good place.

Q:  What advice do you have for someone just starting out as an artist?

A:  As with anything you want to do in your life one needs to be persistent – keep at it, stick with it and work hard through all the ups and downs. And always come back to what joy you had when you started out.
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*You can meet Laurie in her Studio A512 on First Saturday Open Studios. Stop by and say Hello!!

 

 

 

 

 

Featured Artist – John Welch – John Francis Designs – Studio 102

Our newest Featured Artist is woodworker John Welch! You’ve seen his beautiful work, now learn a little bit about the man behind John Francis Designs!


Q: Tell us a little bit about your background. Where are you from? Where did you study? How long have you been an artist?

A: I am a native Lowellian and still live in Lowell with my wife Kara. I’ve always been a maker and doer of sorts, though the type of woodworking I’m doing now has developed over the past few years. My interest in carving began with making cooking spoons in our garage. I enjoy cooking and I thought it would be great to be able to cook with a spoon I made by hand. It grew from there, until I ran out of room in the garage and rented a studio at Western Ave in September 2014.

Q: What is the first thing you remember making/creating by hand?

A:  I am fortunate to have grown up in a very hands on environment. I remember making Christmas ornaments with my parents when I was about 5 year old. They saved the metal lids of frozen juice containers, my mother would make dots with a marker in the shape of snowflakes, trees, etc, and I’d use a hammer and nail to punch out the pattern. That was one of the many creative activities my family would do together. I’ve been told a lot of family and friends still hang them on their trees!

Q:  What is your biggest obstacle with your art?

A: I would have to say time! I have more ideas kicking around than I have time to make. I try to work as efficiently as possible, and I’m slowly working my way down the list. I’m always discovering new techniques and directions I’d like to take my work, but my biggest obstacle is always time.

Q: Describe a typical art creativity session. What is it like? For example, do you work in silence, or do you work to music? Do you prefer to be alone, or do you need people around?

A:  I typically work alone, but I almost never work in silence. I listen to a lot of audio books and podcasts which sometimes help inspire my creativity. If I am doing any work that requires measurements or I’m feeling a little burnt out, I’ll switch over to music to help me zone in…or out.

Q:  What advice do you have for someone just starting out as an artist?

A:  Start making art! It doesn’t matter what your medium is, just start creating. Chances are it won’t be great to start, that’s OK! That is good, that shows you that there is room to grow. For me that is where the fun is, growing from one piece to the next.

Q:  Tell us about some of your goals for the next 6-12 months.

A:  Currently I tend to make functional pieces. I’m planning on dedicating some time for purely sculptural pieces. I really want to explore some free form carving and experiment with different carved textures and see where that leads me.

*You can meet John in his Studio 102 on First Saturday Open Studios. Stop by and say Hello!!

 

 

 

 

Featured Artist – Nancy Tobey – Studio 104

Our newest Featured Artist is Encaustic Painter & Glass Bead Maker Nancy Tobey! Here goes…

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Q: Tell us a little bit about your background. Where are you from? Where did you study? How long have you been an artist?

A: Maybe I was born an artist, but I didn’t really get my first big break until the mid ’90s when I first learned how to use a torch to melt glass. That is when I began my journey into the world of glass beadmaking. I was primarily self taught – reading books, and eventually meeting up with other beadmakers enhanced what I knew and moved me forward in my work. Being a full time beadmaker has been an incredible experience in my life – I truly loved going to work. But several years ago, I decided I needed a hobby and took up painting – starting off with watercolor but quickly moving into encaustic (painting with hot wax) painting. Me and the torch just could not separate! That hobby quickly turned to an obsession, and I am happily wearing two ‘artistic’ hats right now.

Q: What is the first thing you remember making/creating by hand?

A: I am pretty sure that the first thing I made were those woven cotton pot holds – made on a steel loom in all kinds of colors…..loved them! I was a lucky kid, in that my birthday gifts were almost always arts and craft related.
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Q: What do you love most about your art?

A:  Would it be corny to say “just doing it?” Truly though, my joy is in the making. Each time I try something – a new technique or new material – I get a rush of adrenaline. Of course after I make something, I kinda love just looking at it too!

Q: Describe a typical art creativity session. What is it like? For example, do you work in silence, or do you work to music? Do you prefer to be alone, or do you need people around?

A:  If I am making glass – I cannot listen to music. I usually listen to audible books – and find it very easy to concentrate. But painting is different. It is much more physical – I am always moving around the studio and music works really well for me. In both cases, I am at my best when I am working solo.

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Q: How does your personality translate into your art?

A: Short story – its colorful!

Q: Do you have a big seller? What do you think people love about it? And be honest…are you tired of making it?

A: My big seller – its still glass and in particular a bead style called Milano Leaf. Im not tired of making it, though I don’t make as many as I used to — now a days I make maybe 2 -3 a month. In the past I would make 3-5 in a day!

*You can meet Nancy in her Studio 104 on First Saturday Open Studios. Stop by and say Hello!!

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Featured Artist – Art Ferrier – Studio 503

Our newest Featured Artist is Photographer Art Ferrier! Learn a little bit more about him!

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Q: Tell us a little bit about your background. Where are you from? Where did you study? How long have you been an artist?

A: I was born in Lowell, and spent my first 35 years in and around the city. I’ve always been interested in art, and took drawing lessons at the Whistler House when I was small. Photography had a special fascination for me, but it wasn’t until 1974 that I could afford a real camera. A friend showed me what an f-stop was and how to develop and print black & white, and that’s all the instruction I’ve ever received. From that point on it was sort of an obsession, and I taught myself everything from more advanced shooting techniques and theory to color printing.
In the early 80’s I was involved with Art Alive, an artists’ cooperative in Lowell, and showed my work everywhere in the area that I could. In 1985 I had a solo exhibition at the Whistler House, and soon after left the area to live in northern New Hampshire, where photography, both shooting and custom printing, became a major part of my livelihood.

Q: What do you love most about your art?

A: Seeing. I am an intensely visual person, and am constantly scanning the visual environment for details. Most of my influences are painters, largely abstract painters, and my great joy is finding combinations of forms, colors, textures and light around me and creating my images from them. Some of my most successful images have come from junkyards, random walls and shadows, and the side of a dump truck.
I believe that we are constantly surrounded by beauty, if we take the time to look closely for it. The highest compliment and satisfaction that I receive is when folks have told me that after looking at my work they are seeing things that they have walked by for years without noticing.  My other great love has always been printing, in the darkroom for years and now digitally. Making the final decisions about resolution of angles, tonal relationships and so many other things are very exciting. I use Photoshop sparingly, not doing things with software that I could not have done in the darkroom.

window-haikuQ:  What is your biggest obstacle with your art?

A: Probably time, although being at Western Avenue has helped a lot with that. Aside from that it’s the limitations of subject matter. Because I do not generally set things up, but extract all of my images from the environment, I can get frustrated by random things: If a building were just a bit more to the right, if a sign had not been repainted, or if I could just stop in the middle of the highway at rush hour, life would be so much nicer. There have been times when I have come back to a specific building hoping for better light and found that in the interim it had been built next to, had scaffolding put up on it, or torn down.

Q: Describe a typical art creativity session. What is it like? For example, do you work in silence, or do you work to music? Do you prefer to be alone, or do you need people around?

A:  When shooting I generally like to work alone, often with music to focus my attention. Most of my work is urban, and I wander cities for hours scanning for potential images. If I see a building or scene that interests me I might walk around it for awhile, or maybe just sit and think, looking through the camera occasionally. As I walk I am looking up, down, into alleys and sometimes windows, mentally editing my field of vision and imaging more contrast or saturation. Because I was pre-digital I still shoot pretty much the same as I always have, not hitting the shutter till I’m pretty sure, and not shooting more than I need to.
When printing there is always music, usually some type of thoughtful jazz. I get lost in printing for hours at a time.

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Q:  What advice do you have for someone just starting out as an artist?

A: In my other life I’m a high school Social Studies teacher, and spend a lot of time talking to teenagers about creating art. I tell them that if they have any inclination toward art then they should be creating. Expose themselves to different media, different styles, and different approaches to the creative process, but all through it be creating. It builds the human soul. Young artists should not be in a hurry to exhibit, or to define their own styles. Always be open to new ideas, and experiment a lot. My advice to young artists headed for art school is to be sure they pick up some practical skills that they can earn money from, along with developing their creativity and technique. As saxophonist Dewey Redman said long ago, the starving artist is a nice romantic notion, but it’s hard to create when you’re hungry.

Q:  Tell us about some of your goals for the next 6-12 months.

A: I retire from teaching next June, so plans and goals abound! I’ve just purchased a 44″ wide-format printer and plan to spend a good deal of time getting to know it. A big priority is building the business side of what I do. Part of that is photographing artwork and printing for my fellow artists, and another is doing more promotion for commercial shooting.  Artistically, I have a solo show coming up in February at the Lawrence Library in Pepperell that I’m excited about. They have a wonderful gallery space that I hung 61 photos in four years ago. That show was very successful, and they invited me to do an encore. I’m hoping to have between 40 and 50 recent pieces, including some large prints. Aside from that I look forward to more time to visit new places and explore new environments. I’m also thinking seriously about translating my love of form and color into other media, probably pastels and paints. Western Avenue does inspire things like that.

*You can meet Art in his Studio 503 on First Saturday Open Studios. Stop by and say Hello!!

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Featured Artist – Don Ouellette – Studio 533

Our newest Featured Artist is Watercolor & Oil Painter Don Ouellette! Learn a little bit more about him!

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Q: Tell us a little bit about your background. Where are you from? Where did you study? How long have you been an artist?

A: Born in Lowell grew up in the Acre. So Western Avenue was a little like coming back home. I’ve been painting for over 35 years. It started with watercolor lessons with my Dad and became a life long desire to interpret the vanishing New England countryside. Being a painter was usually a part time pursuit due to having a job and raising a family. I studied with well known artist Jack Flynn AWS, Carlton Plummer AWS, Murray Wentwoth NA, Guy Dampier and David Lowrey.  After a layoff from work, art became a full time pursuit that eventually brought me to WAS.

Q: Describe a typical art creativity session. What is it like? For example, do you work in silence, or do you work to music? Do you prefer to be alone, or do you need people around?

A: A typical day at the studio can start at 9 am or Noon (being retired does have certain benefits) finding what excites me on a given day is usually what leads to what I will attempt to create that day. Subject matter will dictate which medium I’ll use. Some days I’ll spend time drawing sketches for the next work. I can work with music or in silence, with others or alone I don’t have a preference.

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Q: How does your personality translate into your art?

A: People have told me my work gives them peace and calm. Serenity is a good thing. Other artists will use conflict and other emotions and are very successful doing that. In a world that moves at the speed of light I try to slow down the hyper drive and find the calm in an ever changing symphony of noise.

Q:  Did you always know you wanted to make the art you make today? Did you start out in a different medium in the early days?

A: If my Dad hadn’t pushed me to take his watercolor class I would not be painting today. My brothers were both artistically gifted at a young age but never pursued Art. Being the one without the gift, sheer determination and perseverance guided my choice. I knew from teaching myself guitar that practice was key to developing and making progress in Art. I worked in watercolor for a number of years before working in oils.

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Q:  What advice do you have for someone just starting out as an artist?

A: Take your time find a teacher that can help you reach your goals. Don’t be afraid to
fail (the best hitters in baseball fail 7 out of 10 at bats.) Early on learn enough technique
so that you will control the medium you choose. Find what you are passionate about
and begin to explore that in an artistic manner.

Q: Do you have a big seller? What do you think people love about it? And be honest…are you tired of making it?

A: I don’t have that one motif that I turn to all the time. It’s good to keep looking and be open to try new and different subjects. If you are a realistic painter try abstracts to help
you push your design skills. Try high and low key paintings. If you work small try a large
canvas. Do things to get out of your comfort zone. Never stop exploring, the next big
thing may be around the corner.

*You can meet Don in his Studio 533 on First Saturday Open Studios. Stop by and say Hello!!

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Featured Artist – Derek McGearty – Scrapsapien – Studio A210

We have so many different types of Artists at Western Avenue! Check out metal worker & welder Derek McGearty! You can visit him in Studio A210!

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Q: Tell us a little bit about your background. Where are you from? Where did you study? How long have you been an artist?

A: Originally from Ireland I came to the US in 2000. I work in engineering mostly Hi-Tech manufacturing which drove me to travel quite a bit. I always liked working with my hands and had always been a bit of a tinkerer. About 10 years ago I bought a welder and started making pieces. I have no formal art education.

Q: What is the first thing you remember making/creating by hand?

A: It was not art. It was an electronics/kinetics experiment; an alarm system for my bedroom in a Rube Goldberg vein.

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Q: What do you love most about your art?

A: It can be challenging to represent an activity that is already small in an even smaller scale and still manage to convey the meaning. I love to go to my studio put on my work gear, some music and see what happens. It’s a great feeling to create a piece that you have pride in and that you can see improvement in from the last.

Q: Describe a typical art creativity session. What is it like? For example, do you work in silence, or do you work to music? Do you prefer to be alone, or do you need people around?

A: Typically I am more productive with minimal distraction, but I love interacting with folks. I will usually turn on some classic rock and just go at it; the music sometimes sends a piece in a different direction. Because my parts are based on the human form I tend to pose myself in various action stances so as to understand the positioning I need to represent. I’m sure it looks great, me in my studio, work gear on, respirator on my face, welding mask on my head and welding gloves on my hands, posing like I am riding a motorbike or playing a trumpet.

Q: How does your personality translate into your art?

A:Subtle details in my pieces like the faces and 90% of the poses are based on me.

painter-1Q: Did you always know you wanted to make the art you make today? Did you start out in a different medium in the early days?

A: No not at all. I used to love to draw and paint. My mother and Grandmother both of whom are/were very creative with brushes and pencils rubbed off on me. I always loved woodwork but my career brought me a different direction. The welder was picked up more as an opportunity to learn something that had always interested me. The art came from living in the Southwest and being inspired by others.

Q:  Do you have a big seller? What do you think people love about it? And be honest…are you tired of making it?

A: I had made this hot dog cooker set (R Rated) It was hugely popular and a bit raunchy, I made so many pairs I can’t even count. I wanted to stop making them but materials and rent aren’t free. If you want to support your art you have to work or sell it. Great painters and sculptors all did commission work on subject matter that they most likely had no interest in but, it paid. This allowed them to work on things they were passionate about. Everything you do, if you do it for a long time, will have a certain amount of monotony, throw on some great music or an audio book and plug through it.

Q: Describe your favorite way to spend a Sunday morning.
A: Sleeping in, Coffee, hearty breakfast

*You can meet Derek in his Studio A210 on First Saturday Open Studios. Stop by and say Hello!!

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Featured Artist – Sukey Blake – DHC Jewelry @Hashtag What Studios – Studio 122

Read and learn about the multi-talented Sukey Blake! Swing into Studio 122 to see all of her fabulous creations!

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Q: Tell us a little bit about your background. Where are you from? Where did you study? How long have you been an artist?

A: I was born in Troy NY grew up in the burbs of Philadelphia, spent 30 years living in Illinois, moved to Lowell Ma. in 2009. My educational background is not in art, but in social work and library science. I have always been creative and crafty. I have been beading and making jewelry since 2011, my daughter needed jewelry for a wedding found nothing in the stores, found loose beads that we liked , and thereby my obsession with beading bloomed into DHC (Drive Husband Crazy) Jewelry.

Q: What is the first thing you remember making/creating by hand?

A: Restringing my mother’s broken necklaces into new creations, until this question was asked had not thought about having done this as a child. I was about 4 or 5 years old and my older sister and I had a shoe box with all my mothers broken necklaces in it, we would sit on the bed and bead new creations, wish I had some of those beads now.

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Q: What do you love most about your art?

A: I love to bead as I can do it anywhere, with any object that has a hole in it.

Q: How does your personality translate into your art?

A: My jewelry is unique and whimsical.

blue-crystal-knockerQ: Did you always know you wanted to make the art you make today? Did you start out in a different medium in the early days?

A: No I did not know I was going to make art I always thought of myself as creative, but my mother was an ARTIST and had been asked at an early age why I was not making work similar to hers, guess I just needed to find a medium that she did not work in.

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*You can meet Sukey in her Studio 122 on First Saturday Open Studios and at the Tyngsboro American Legion Post Fall Craft Fair October 10, 2015 9-4 Stop by and say Hello!!